Tiger Teddy Fish

Tiger Teddy Fish (Best Breeding Guide of the Year)

Tiger Teddy Fish

Tiger Teddy Fish

Tiger teddy fish is the live-bearing fish. There are so many exciting and colorful livebearers in nature. It’s a shame that fish stores are generally satisfied with carrying the big four– guppies, platies, mollies, and swordtails.

Why is tiger teddy challenging to find in stores?

It is easier to find some of the less common livebearers online from breeders specializing in them, but even then, the tiger teddy is a delicate fish to get ahold of.

One of the reasons it is not as popular as such pleasantly colored fish should be is due to its size.

Fish size

The females barely come in at 1 inch (they reach 2.5cm) and the males are smaller. This limits what kind of fish can be kept with them.

However, there is a bigger problem that damages their popularity.

Nature:

The females are sometimes very aggressive and capable of killing small tankmates. With larger tankmates and with you, the Tiger Teddy will be very shy.

Tank Size, Origin, Fish size, Feeding

It is recommended, to reduce aggression that you keep them in a heavily planted aquarium. A pair can be easily held in a planted 2 gallon (7 liters) tank, but
Origin: Columbia
Size: 2- 2.5 cm / less than 1″
Temperature: 25°F/ 76°
Feeding: They accept any small foods including powdered food

Habitat:

They need to be kept in a heavily planted tank, not just to reduce casualties due to aggression, but the microorganisms living on plants provide the fry with a source of food. Filtration should not produce a strong current but needs to be effective.

These fish like clean water and need a weekly water change. The intake pipe on the filter should be fitted with a sponge to prevent these tiny fish from being sucked up. The pH should be kept at 7 or slightly higher.

Breeding:

Livebearers but the fry are too small to eat most live foods. They can only take infusoria at first. Preparation should be kept on hand if you hope to breed and sell this fish. They will need a bigger space once they start breeding. They produce young in a slightly different way than other livebearers.

Once fertilized, the developing babies trigger the development of other eggs within the female. This allows for the existence of many babies at different stages of development, and the result is the female will continually give birth to a few babies every couple of days.

Do you want to know some more freshwater fish?

  1. AMur Goby freshwater fish
STRIPED BULLDOG PLECO

STRIPED BULLDOG RUBBERNOSE PLECO (Latest Guide )

STRIPED BULLDOG PLECO

STRIPED BULLDOG PLECO

STRIPED BULLDOG PLECO/ STRIPED RUBBER NOSE PLECO (Chaetostoma formosae) is formerly known as L187b. Also, L444 was found to be genetically identical, so that is now referred to as C. formosae as well.

I have mentioned in the past that not all plecos have the same requirements, although usually when I say that I am referring to food requirements.

The Striped Rubbernose Pleco has a different need you need to meet if you want to keep it alive; rapidly moving highly oxygenated water.

Tank And Nature

These little catfish are ideal candidates for a hillstream tank. But if you are going to keep it in a hillstream tank with the usual types of rock dwelling fish such as hillstream or Garra loaches, be sure to have lots decor that creates a broken line of sight, and builds lots of caves. The same holds true if you plan to have more than one rubber nose. They can be very territorial with each other.

Caves are a good idea so each fish will need a cave or crevice to claim as its own to retreat into. If you are using a gravel substrate, be sure to anchor the stones or cement them together with aquarium-safe silicon because, if the rubber nose pleco does not like the caves provided, he or she will attempt to excavate their own underneath the stones. A single specimen could be kept in a 20-gallon tank, but a 30 (115 liter) is better when housing more than one.
Origin: Columbia
Size: 4in/ 10cm
Temperature: 20-24°C/ 68-75°F

Feeding:

Likes to feed on the biofilm and algae growing on the stones, walls and other decorations in the aquarium. They reluctantly eat vegetables but love and need regular feedings of frozen bloodworms or other invertebrates.

Habitat:

Whenever keeping these fish, you need to have an oversized filter on the tank creating a steady flow as well as an additional powerhead and added oxygen. Rocks and driftwood can be added, but it is hard to grow plants in the strong currents these fish prefer. The substrate can be entirely stone of gravel of various sizes. Employ bright lighting to encourage the growth of algae and biofilm for these fish to graze on.

Breeding:

These fish may spawn in caves in well-established tanks, but setting up a separate spawning tank for them to breed it has so far produced no results. Spawnings in captivity have all been accidental.

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Pearly Ocellatus

PEARLY OCELLATUS (Small Freshwater Fish Care Guide)

Pearly Ocellatus

Pearly Ocellatus

Keeping Pearly Ocellatus

Pearly Ocellatus scientifically named as Lamprologus stappersi. The shell dwelling cichlids of Lake Tanganyika are among the most entertaining fish you can follow. The males actively entertain their favorite shell from envious rivals, but be sure to give these active little fish plenty of shells to choose from.

There should be more shells than there are fish. They get along fine with other fish with different lifestyles, but they will fight with other shell dwellers. To keep the peace in their colony, it is best to have a ratio of 3 females to 1 male.

Because of the water chemistry of Lake Tanganyika, it is best to house them with other species from there as many fish commonly seen in pet stores will not be able to tolerate the high pH required for the Pearly Ocellatus to thrive. They are a small fish, and a pair can inhabit a ten gallon/35 liter tank.

Origin: Lake Tanganyika
Size: 6cm /2in
Temperature: 23-27°C/ 73-82°F

Feeding:

This fish may not always accept prepared food even though most in shops are captive raised animals. Feed them instead of live and frozen foods.

Habitat:

A sandy aquarium with many empty snail shells that have apertures large enough for the fish to enter. The sand should be at least at least 6cm deep as these fish like to dig and will construct pits to raise their young. PH should be between 7.5 and 9.

Breeding:

The males display in front of their shell. Eventually, the female enters and lays eggs inside. After the babies hatch, they are transferred to a pit and protected by both parents…unless the colony is becoming crowded. In that case, you may want to remove the babies from the parents care or they newborns will be eaten.

Amur Goby

AMUR GOBY (Feeding, Breeding and Tank Setup)

Amur Goby

Amur Goby

AMUR GOBY belongs to “Rhinogobius Brunneus” While the majority of the more than 2000 species of gobies are found in marine waters, there is a small percentage available to freshwater keepers. Among these, the genre of Rhinogobius stands out as several species are sometimes available to aquarists.

The Amur Goby is one of these and is perfect for unheated aquaria. There is some confusion in the R. brunneus group as the body colors and facial markings can vary widely based on location and habitat.

In addition, in some populations, the young upon hatching are washed down to the sea while others are landlocked and the young settle in still freshwater lakes or slow-moving rivers.

One paper I read for this suggested that the fully freshwater variety is actually R. flumineus, but that species is found only in Japan while the freshwater Amur Gobies range throughout northeast Asia.

Can we keep amur gobby in a home aquarium?

The ones in the photo are fully freshwater individuals from Korea. Amur gobies are easy to keep in a home aquarium and will reproduce if provided protein-rich foods.

Amur gobies must be kept in a group otherwise they become inactive and may eventually refuse to feed. You should have at least two males in the tank and several females. The males are territorial and will engage in battles that consist of opening their jaws as wide as possible and displaying their fins.

These battles are frequent and rarely lead to injury. Amur gobies are smaller than some of their relatives and a small group can be comfortably kept in a 20 gallon/70 liter tank.

Feeding:

Give these fish live or frozen food. Some may learn to eat pellets, but many never recognize that as food. They prefer bloodworms, blackworms, chopped earthworms, mosquito larvae, and other aquatic insects and crustaceans.

Habitat:

Their tank can have a sand or gravel substrate and should contain many stones. The stones should be arranged to create caves and overhangs which could be utilized in spawning. The water should have a good current but not as fast as hillstream conditions. The water should be well-oxygenated.

Breeding:

The males displays at the mouth of his cave. The female enters to deposit the eggs and then leaves the male who protects and fans the eggs. Studies have shown it is not beneficial to have two males present at this time.

Although they can still spawn when more than one male is in the tank, the survival rate of the eggs and fry are lower as the male spends less time fanning his brood.

RED BELLIED PIRANHA

RED BELLIED PIRANHA (Best Food Breeding Habitat Short Guide)

RED BELLIED PIRANHA

RED-BELLIED PIRANHA

The “red-bellied piranha is probably the best-known resident of the Amazon River not only by aquarists but among the general public.

Information to know? Hollywood films and nature documentaries have given this fish a fearsome reputation, so

Tank Setup

It may surprise many people that the red-bellied piranha is one of the best of the many piranha species to keep if you have an aquarium of sufficient size.

However, depending on where you live, you may not be able to own one. Many countries with subtropical and tropical climates have banned their sale.

In the US, 22 states prohibit the ownership of all piranhas with 4 others requiring keepers and fish stores carrying them to have an exotic animal permit.

When I growing up in the US, they were a common sight in fish stores; not a staple like guppies but you would see them as often as something like kissing gouramis.

They disappeared sometime in the 80s as feral populations began establishing themselves in warmer areas of the country.

Where I live now, they are legal to keep and various sizes are sold online. It seems the breed easily in a large tank and all the red-bellies being sold here are captive bred. Juveniles can be kept in a smaller tank, but an adult needs a tank of 300 gallons/1100 liters or so.

Tank mates

The young form groups, but adults can be kept singly or in groups of five or more. Interestingly, you can keep adults with many small, tetra-sized species of fish. Piranhas have no interest in expending the energy to hunt fish much smaller than they are.
Origin: Most of the northern half of South America
Size: 25cm/ 10″, but there are some similarly colored species that grow twice that length.
Temperature: 24-28°C/ 74°-82°F

Best Food?

Depending on the size, bloodworms, earthworms, insects, strips of fish, chopped shrimp, and mussels. They also eat vegetables, seeds, and nuts.

Habitat:

Red-bellies like to have a sand substrate which they need for breeding, but many keepers prefer a substrate-less aquarium to make it easier to clean. Piranhas produce a lot of waste do an oversized filter is s good idea. Plants may be destroyed when these fish are nesting, but driftwood is a good choice to decorate the tank as long as the fish have plenty of swimming room.

Breeding:

Red-bellied piranha breed like sunfish. The male digs a pit into which the female deposits more than 1000 eggs. The male guards the nest and he is sometimes joined by the female in this task. The babies grow at different rates and the larger ones will eat the smaller ones. Decide how many fries you want to grow out and remove them to rearing tanks where you can divide them by size. Red-bellies can breed from 10cm long (4″)

molly fish types

40+ Molly Fish Types (Best Mollies Images Guide)

molly fish types

molly fish types

List Of Different Species of Molly fish Images

The Guide about the molly fish types with images that are explaining the color shape and kind of graphics.

albino lt molly

albino lt molly

Black Molly

Black Molly

calico swordtail

calico swordtail

Mix Balloon Molly

Mix Balloon Molly

Black Sailfin Molly

Black Sailfin Molly

Mixed Swordtails

Mixed Swordtails

Black Hifin

Black Hifin

Dalmation Lyretail Molly

Dalmation Lyretail Molly

Pineapple wagtail

Pineapple wagtail

Dalmation Balloon Molly

Dalmation Balloon Molly

Black Swordtail

Black Swordtail

Gold Calio

Gold Calio

Gold Marble Balloon Molly

Gold Marble Balloon Molly

Black It Molly

Black It Molly

Gold Metallic Molly

Gold Metallic Molly

Gold Swordtail

Gold Swordtail

Gold Dust Balloon Molly

Gold Dust Balloon Molly

Gold hi Fin Swordtail

Gold hi Fin Swordtail

Gold Lyretail Swordtail

Gold Lyretail Swordtail

Green Lyretail Sailfin Molly

Green Lyretail Sailfin Molly

Hi Fin Swordtail

Hi Fin Swordtail

Koi Swordtail

Koi Swordtail

Green Swordtail

Green Swordtail

pineapple hifin Swordtail

pineapple hifin Swordtail

Orange Molly

Orange Molly

Neon Swordtail

Neon Swordtail

pineapple hifin

pineapple hi fin

Pineapple Swordtail

Pineapple Swordtail

Sailfin Dalmation Molly

Sailfin Dalmation Molly

Molly Golden Velifera

Molly Golden Velifera

Red lyretail Swordtail

Red lyretail Swordtail

Leopard Sailfin Molly

Leopard Sailfin Molly

Lyretail Black

Lyretail Black

Marble Balloon Molly

Marble Balloon Molly

Red Hifin Swordtail

Red Hifin Swordtail

Redeye Swordtail

Redeye Swordtail

Golden Lyretail Molly

Golden Lyretail Molly

Lyretail Red Wagtail

Lyretail Red Wagtail

Molly Red Blood Sailfin

Molly Red Blood Sailfin

Molly Calico Balloon

Molly Calico Balloon

Golden Dotted Balloon Molly

Golden Dotted Balloon Molly

Green Golden Dotted Balloon Molly

Green Golden Dotted Balloon Molly

Red Swordtail

Red Swordtail

Red Wagtail Swordtail

Red Wagtail Swordtail

Silver Balloon Molly

Silver Balloon Molly

Silver Molly

Silver Molly

Read More about Molly Fish If you are interested here is Definitive Guide For You

  1. Molly Fish Complete Care Guide with Infographics & Video
YoYo Loach (Botia Lohachata)

YoYo Loach Tank Setup, Caring and Breeding Profile

YoYo Loach

YoYo Loach

Yoyo Loach Introduction:

Beautifully patterned Yoyo loach fish gets its common name from the markings on its side that seem to spell out the word “yo-yo.”There are several other, closely related species that also go by that name but B. lohachata displays the word more clearly than the others.

It is also commonly called the Pakistan loach, but that just leads to confusion as it is used for several intricately patterned botias and the yoyo loach is not from Pakistan.

Tank Mates Analysis:

These fish are very fast moving and lively so they may cause stress among slow-moving tankmates. And while most get along well with other fish individuals have been known to find the long fins of some tankmates irresistible. Some botias may show aggression towards similarly shaped fishes when they are kept singly or in pairs. That is because they are highly social creatures with a relatively high intelligence.

Tank size & setup:

They require the social interaction of a group of 4 or more yoyo loaches to satisfy them. They are also extremely curious and quickly become stressed in a bare tank. Give them lots of places to explore like caves, clusters of stones, groves of plants or man-made decorations. But be careful! Yoyo loaches like to squeeze into tight areas and sharp decorations can injure them. A 30 gallon/ 115-liter tank is sufficient for a group.

Fish Size & Origin:

They are found in the waters of Nepal and India. Maximum supply you can get from these areas may be you can also get the price difference if you buy them from these areas.

Such Loaches can grow up to the size of 10 cm or 4 inches in size. This is the mature size the fish can gain in Lbs.

Optimum Temperature Range:

Does not require a heated aquarium but can tolerate up to 27°C/ 82°F.So there is no Specific Parameter in this regard.

Feeding:

Botias will eat anything from dried to live foods and from algae wafers to soft-leaved plants. The also will eat snails but not at a rate of clearing up an infestation for you.

Habitat:

Botias like clean well-oxygenated water. Sand or fine gravel is preferable as a substrate so as not to damage their barbels. And of course, lots of decors for them to explore. They are interesting, social fishes that make good residents for most community tanks. There are some exceptions though.

How to do Breeding?

These fish migrate up streams to spawn in nature. It has not occurred in captivity without the use of hormones.

May you love to read more about other loaches profiles?

  1. Caring a Dojo Loach Feed and Breeding Guide
  2. White & Spotted Nosed Laoch

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Spotfin Chub Turquoise Shiner (Cyprinella Monacha)

Spotfin Chub Turquoise Shiner Brief Care Guide

Spotfin Chub Turquoise Shiner

Spotfin Chub Turquoise Shiner

Brief Introduction:

This is a fish I wanted to highlight because of its beauty and the potential it would have in the aquarium industry. It is NOT an endorsement for anyone to seek out and collect this fish!

Background:

It is threatened or endangered throughout its range and is extinct in Alabama and Georgia as well as from the main branch of the Tennessee River.

There are organizations breeding these fish in captivity and reintroducing them into places they formerly inhabited where possible and there are reports that several wild breeding populations have been re-established.

Several things happened that devastated the population of this fish. The worst occurred in 1957 when the government began a program to stock trout into many river systems.

That in itself is problematic in areas where the trout were not native, but prior to seeding the Tennessee River with trout fingerlings, the government poisoned the river with ichthyocides fish killing poisons to eliminate competition for food, possible predators, and egg eaters to ensure the trouts’ survival.

Attempting to help the fish populations recover has been difficult for the little spot fin chub because it is intolerant of suspended particles in the water.

Farming and Keeping in Home Aquarium:

Development at many places along the river as well as runoff from farms prevents the chub’s fry from developing and clog the gills of adult fish. But can you imagine this fish in the aquarium trade?

In the hands of a dedicated selective breeder, the beautiful blue body color of the adult male could be made the usual coloration of aquarium specimens as id the case of the reds in the Rosy Barb.

Perhaps with continued work of the conservation agencies working to restore this fish, that may one day be possible.

Origin:

This Beautiful Fish is present in the Tennessee River and its tributaries the USA(United States of America).

Size of Specimen:

The fish can grow Up to the Size of 8cm Or 3″ inches in size. This is the mature fish size up to it can grow in size and Lbs.

Is the water temperature need to be maintained?

There is no specific range or need to install the heater in the aquarium or tank to grow them. The Room temperature is enough to keep them so care level is easy in this manner.

What do they eat?

In nature, the feed on insect larvae and small invertebrates. When young they feed exclusively from the bottom but become bolder as they grow and will feed on the water column. Feed live and frozen foods, but the captive bred specimens are raised on high-quality pellets.

Housing & Habitat:

A substrate of either sand or gravel is fine, but add several larger stones to mimic their natural habitat. The like good water which can be achieved by adding extra aeration. A powerhead is not necessary if the filtration is strong. They do not live in torrent conditions.

Tank Size

A tank of 30 gallons/ 115 liters would be sufficient for a group of 5 or 6. This tank size is kept by Majority of the fish hobbyist.

Breeding:

These fish breed like many barbs and danios. The eggs must be protected from the parents who will attempt to eat them immediately after spawning.

Wanna Read more About Coldwater profiles?

  1. White Perch (Morone Americana)
  2. Bluenose Shiner (Pteronotropis Welaka)

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Water Sprite (Ceratopteris Thalictroides)

How to Grow and care Water Sprite in Home Aquarium

Water Sprite (Ceratopteris Thalictroides)

Water Sprite (Ceratopteris Thalictroides)

What is Water Sprite?

With the exception of duckweed, water sprite is probably the easiest of all aquarium plants the grow. It is hardy, tolerates a wide range of temperatures and lighting, removes ammonia and nitrates from the water and provides hiding places for young fish.

Method and benefit of growing them?

It can be grown as a rooted plant or left to float on the surface where it will send up leaves above the water and send long, branching roots down into the water column.

It is one of the best choices for the basic community aquarium that was set up without fertilizer or special lighting.

Water sprite can grow well utilizing the fish waste, and as long as there is some light source over the tank, it will be fine. There are a few exceptions to its uses, though.

Goldfish and some cichlids love to graze on the soft leaves of the water sprite. And of course, like all plants, you should not attempt to raise it with most lake cichlids. They will just tear it up out of spite.

Where is it not recommended?

I do not recommend water sprite for a carefully planned aquascape. That is because it grows too quickly and would soon crowd out the other plants without constant pruning. It takes quite a bit of effort to actually kill your water sprite, but there are some was. One way is to start with. An unhealthy plant.

Where to Buy?

If you are buying it in a fish store, and most fish stores regularly carry it, do not purchase one that has brown leaves or stems. Those have probably been sitting in a fishless tank at the dealer’s tank for a while without access to any nutrients.

How it looks When Healthy?

Water sprite should be light green when healthy. Another way to kill it is to use the copper based medication in your tank such as those used to treat ich. Of course, that will have a negative effect on most plants.

Origin:

Water Sprite

Water Sprite

It is present Worldwide in tropical countries where the all twelve months the temperature has the mean value of at least 18-degree Celsius.

Growth & Size of the Plant:

Growing in full natural sunlight, water sprite can reach 100cm/ 36″, but in the aquarium, they are usually half that size. Feel free to trim without harm to the plant.

Temperature Limitations:

Most sites say 20-28°C/ 68-82°F. However, I keep some growing in my indoor swamp which is on an unheated balcony. The temperature drops to the single digits Celsius, upper 30s/low 40s Fahrenheit.

The aerial stems and leaves turn a dark chocolate brown (and would probably look nice in a dried arrangement) but I don’t cut them.

In the spring, each stem develops a dozen or so bright green plantlets. These can be removed and planted in the soil, or the entire stem can be laid on top of the water and each plantlet will rapidly develop roots.

Habitat & Living Place:

As long as its wet, they are not picky. When grown in boggy conditions or floating, they show what the really are; ferns. New leaves emerge in the typical fiddlehead style as terrestrial ferns.

They do not hold up well in hillstream tanks. If the water is too strong, pieces will break off and either clog the intake of your filter or float at the top developing roots there.

Propagation & Movement:

If you have a plant from the store that has roots, you can either drop it in the tank and let it float (which is a great option for livebearers, betta, and gouramis), or root it in the soil. If you are rooting it, be sure not to bury the crown of the plant.

Reproducing the plant is easy, Just cut off a leaf, the bigger the piece the better, and let it float. It will soon put out roots and new leaves. If you do that once in a while, you will soon have enough plants for all your friends.

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