Banjo Catfish (Bunocephalus Coracoides)

Banjo Catfish (Bunocephalus Coracoides)

Banjo Catfish (Bunocephalus Coracoides)

Banjo Catfish (Bunocephalus Coracoides)

Banjo Catfish (Bunocephalus Coracoides) If you like bright, active fish that are always out and about in the aquarium, the Banjo Batfish is definitely not for you. But if you appreciate an interesting shape, and a sense of calm in your fish tank, then you shoukd definitely consider this fish. I had a female Banjo for years and I was always excited when I could view her. At least I think it was her. Male and female banjo cats look identical except the females become rounder. And while it was exciting to see her, I would often go for months without knowing if she was alive. Banjos spend the daylight hours buried under the substrate or, even better, under sunken leaves which they imitate perfectly. In fact, banjos are among the easiest fish to net because they refuse to give up the leaf imitation. Seeing that their camaflauge skills are so good and their habits are so secretive, it would be easy to jump to the conclusion that this is a fish predator which might swallow your Neon Tetras at night. However, that would be wrong. Banjos do not eat fish. They prefer to forage for aquatic insects and small worms at night, the only time they are active. They are equally content being in a tank on their own, as they are in a group. They show no signs of aggression towards each other. They also can be kept in a community tank as long as you take two precautions. First, you must feed them after the lights have been off for about an hour or so to make sure the tankmates don’t eat all the banjo’s food. Second, you need to avoid large, sharp, or hard substrates. A Banjo Cat that cannot cover itself will not be happy.
Origin: Peru, Brazil, Bolivia
Size: 15cm / 16 inches
Temperature: 21-27°C/ 70-80°F
Diet: Any food that sinks. They love bloodworms but also will happily eat the sinking tablets made for cories.
Habitat: Despite its adult size, this fish can live without issues in a much smaller tank than expected because it is so sedentary. Some sites say a single specimen can be kept in as lityle as 71 liters or around 20 gallons. I think a little more room would be preferable and I would sugest at a 30 gallon. The perfect setup would be a dimly lit tank with soft sand and a layer of leaves, like oak or birch, conering the botyom with some plants and driftwood. If you collect leaves, be sure it is from areas where no pesticides have been used, soak them thoroughly until they sink, and rinse before adding them to the tank.
Breeding: Eggs are laid above the substrate. The parents will eat the eggs if they come across the while foraging, so move them to another tank.

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