Daisy's Rice Fish (Oryzias Woworae)

Daisy’s Rice Fish (Oryzias Woworae)

Daisy's Rice Fish (Oryzias Woworae)

Daisy’s Rice Fish (Oryzias Woworae)

Daisy’s Rice Fish (Oryzias Woworae) My first thought upon seeing this fish for sale for the first time was not “how pretty” but “who’s Daisy?” As it turns out, Daisy Woworae is a museum worker in Java who was the first person to photograph these fish in there natural habitat and to collect some for science. That was in 2010 and after that the fish was introduced to aquarists where it has found a niche and is growing in popularity and availability. The only limiting factors are (A) their size and (B) they don’t show their best colors in a fish store display tank. Their small size means you have to be careful what you house them with. At just 3cm/ 1inch long, even some commonly kept community fish like swordtails, angelfish, and mid-sized gouramis might take an unhealthy interest in these tiny fish. Their colors in fish shops tends to wash out, especially if the tank is bare. They may appear silvery with a hint of red outlining some fins. However, once you get them home in a tank where they can feel secure and their full delicate beauty emerges. The males become a metalic blue while their paired fins are red and the tail has an attractive red outline. The females tend to look more golden than blue. Their paired fins are often clear but the may have more red outlining the lower half of their body. They tend to shoal rather than school but they still like to have a group of their own kind around them. Consider buying 8 or more if you get them. At their size, even a large group like that can be kept in a 10 gallon/ 40 liter tank. They don’t have any special water requirements, but they look great in a planted tank and will help reduce algae on plants as the browse for food throughout the day. They are not fully algae eaters, but the do include it in their diet as they wait to be fed.
Origin: Indonesia
Size: 1inch/ 3cm
Temperature: 23-27°C/ 73°-82°F
Food: Easily fed on any small food, including flakes. Their volors show up best on a varied diet.
Habitat: Although they are from slow moving, heavily shaded forest streams where there is little sunlight for plants, they look great in planted tanks. Their natural habitat includes a lot of fallen branches and leaves in the water over a sand bottom. But these fish are not picky and you can design your tank in any way you wish.
Breeding: Like other rice fish, the females lay eggs at dawn that remain atteched to them by a tiny string. Eventually the small cluster of eggs brishes against something and remains stuck their. The parents will not eat the eggs, but the fry will be eaten. In my case, I would transfer egg-carrying females to a floating net breeding box with hornwort in the morning. By afternoon I would remove her. Eggs hatch between one and two weeks later. Usually, just 5-15 eggs are produced at a time, but they can lay eggs almost daily if in good health.

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