Flash Tiger Knifefish (Gymnotus Tigre)

Flash Tiger Knifefish (Gymnotus Tigre)

Flash Tiger Knifefish (Gymnotus Tigre)

Flash Tiger Knifefish (Gymnotus Tigre)

Flash Tiger Knifefish (Gymnotus Tigre)  Here is another new fish to the aquarium hobby. Only discovered in 2003, the Flash Tiger can be distinguished from some of its near relatives by having irregular bands. It has terrible eyesight and relies on its sense of smell and weak electrical impulses to find its way around the aquarium and to locate food. Ideally, food are such items as chopped prawn. However, smaller tankmates that fit into its mouth are also on the menu. Finding tankmates for the flash tiger can be problematic. Males of the species can be very aggressive with each other and with other larger fish. One owner reported that his oscar’s fins were damaged by his knifefish attacking it. Females, are far less aggressive. So how do you know if you have a male or female? Well, except by their aggression level, you cannot tell. There are no visual sexual dimorphism. Therefore, they are better off kept as a single specimen or, if you have a less aggressive one, kept with peaceful but sturdy cichlids like those in the genus Heros or Geophagus. All flash tigers that are currently on the market are wild caught. These means that they require a period of adjustment to captivity. They will eventually learn to come out when fed, but prior to that will spend a good part of their time hiding. Tigers in display tanks in gish stores are going to be quite stressed and patience will be needed to rear them. It is important that you give them an environment they feel comfortable in with dim lights and a lot of cover. A tank that is 1m long/ 3feet, is the absolute minimum length for this fish and larger is better. Like all knifefish, the flash tiger can swim backwards effortlessly by reversing the undulating motion of its fins. Also, like all knifefish, they are extremely sensitive to deteriorating water conditions which will cause velvet disease or ich and to the medications commonly used to treat those diseases. It is better to avoid illnesses altogether by keepingbthe tank clean and well filtered.
Origin: Columbia
Size: 40cm/ 16 inches
Temperature: 23°C/ 75°F
Feeding: Meaty foods like strips of fish, choped clams or prawns, and bloodworms. If kept with other fish be sure your knifefish is getting enough to eat maybe feeding about 30 minutes after the lights are off.
Habitat: Likes a dimly lit tank with lots of cover such as tangles of roots and clumps of low-light tolerant plants. The substrate should be sand.
Breeding: Thhese fish have not yet been spawned in captivity to my knowledge. Two members of the genus build floating nests while another close relative is a mouth breeder. It remains to be discovered how these fish breed

by

Our team is Working Very hard day and night to provide you a complete guide to an aquarium and tropical fishes and how to keep and treat them.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *