OSCAR (Astronotus Ocellatus)

OSCAR (Astronotus Ocellatus)

OSCAR (Astronotus Ocellatus)

OSCAR (Astronotus Ocellatus)

OSCAR (Astronotus Ocellatus) All of us in this group are passionate about our fish, otherwise we wouldn’t be a part of a group. But in the aquarium hobby there are three groups of fishkeepers that demonstrate a strong attachment to and passion for their fish. Those would be people who raise puffers, bettas, and oscars. It not surprising that all of these fish share a similar trait that makes it possible for people to bond with their fish. They recognize their owners and seem to beg for attention from them. Of course, before our emotional side takes over, we can admit that this response to the owner’s presence is a Pavlovian reaction. They know that a certain person means food is possible to rain down from the sky due to the fact that the humans think swimming back and forth excitedly in front of the glass is cute. However, the oscar does demonstrate other characteristics besides begging for food that make keeping one more akin to owning a puppy than many fish. For example, oscars are famous for their ability to sulk. When you first get an oscar or when you upgrade it to a new tank the fish seem to go through a period of sulking where they often become less actiive, turn pale. And may refuse to eat. Don’t wory, he or she will soon be content again after they get their pique out of their system. Although they are very popular, think twice or even three times before buying them. They require a longterm commitment and they get relatively large. A single specimen needs a minimum of 190 liters, 50 gallons but more volume is better. Also consider carefully before deciding to breed these fish. They can have up to 2000 eggs at one time and, like the convict cichlid, fish shops are unlikely to take them they often have enough in stock from who have returned their adult fish because of space constraints. Populations of wild oscar occur in several countries where irresponsible fishkeepers had released their unwanted pets into local waterways.
Origin: Most of South America
Size: 25-35cm/ 9-14″
Temperature: 20-28°C/68-82°F
Feeding: They are unfussy eaters in the aquarium and they will take any live or frozen foods. They will also eat pellets. In nature their preferred food are different species of small amazonian catfish, so be careful what you house them with. They will accept vegetable matter when they ate very hungry.
Habitat: Oscars are from places where the water moves slowly so, although you will need heavy filtration for these large fish, do not have the return water flowing too strongly. A good filter is essential, preferably a sump, as they are sensitive to the hole-in-head disease when kept in dirty water. A sump is also a good idea because the heater can be kept there. Oscars reportedly are able to break heaters. Do not decorate your tank as in the photo. Oscars dig in the substrate and will uproot plants.
Breeding: Eggs are laid on flat rocks with both parents caring for them They babies can be separated from the parents immediately after thet are free swimming

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