Ruby Tetra (Axelrodia Riesei)

Ruby Tetra (Axelrodia Riesei)

Ruby Tetra (Axelrodia Riesei)

Ruby Tetra (Axelrodia Riesei)

Ruby Tetra (Axelrodia Riesei)  When you go into a fish store, especially place where large chain stores exist, you find yourself looking at the same types of fish on display. In the case of tetras, there about a half dozen, like neons and black skirts, that are a staple in all shops while another half dozen, including species like the bleeding heart tetra and the congo tetra, that turn up fairly regularly. But there are so many other types of tetras available. Many are just started in recent years to become more widely available. Species like the coffee bean tetra, ember tetra, and today’s featured fish the ruby tetra were completely unknown to most aquarists just two decades ago. One of the reasons that this gem took so long to be introduced into the aquarium hobby is because it is from a very remote area and possibly relegated to a singlr tributary along the Orinoco River in South America. Another reason was because of its incredibly small size– adults are about half the size of a neon tetra! However the small size and glowing red color make it an aquascaper’s dream particularly in nano tanks. However, if you are going to keep it properly a small nano cube aquarium is not the way to go. Maybe a 10 gallon/ 40 liter tank is okay for a small group, but long is better than a cube. Besides needing space for a group, the males set up territories which they defend from other males. A longer tank provides less line of sight, especially if it is well planted, and allows subdominant males the opportunity to retreat. They are not a schooling fish like many other small tetras, but you still need to buy a group of eight or more. If you buy less, the fish will have no confidence and will hide in fear at every passing shadow. Being in a group makes them feel more confident. They are peaceful but care must be taken when choosing tankmates. Fish that are normally fine with tetras like gouramis, rams, and swordtails would fine these little tetras a tasty…and pricey.. morsal. Keep them instead with other small fish like pygmy corydoras, galaxy danios, or dwarf rasbora. Unfortunately, the glowing red color of the wild caught specimens fades with time in captivity and tank bred specimens are never as bright. Perhaps soon though, skilled breeders will be able to strengthen the colors.
Origin: Columbia
Size: 1.5cm to 2cm/ .5 to.7 inches
Temperature: 20-28°C/ 68-82°F
Diet: Any small live, frozen, or dried food. Varying their diet to ensures their health and allows wild specimens to keep their bright colors longer.
Habitat: They are from blackwater environments in nature so they prefer a tank that is either kept dimly lit. However they also thrive in one that has a lot of shade in the form of plants and driftwood. The pH should be below neutral. Add some dried leaves that will sink to the bottom and release tannins as well as host microscopic live food.
Breeding: Egg scatterers, they tend to lay their eggs among fine leaved plants in captivity. In a species tank with leaf litter on the substrate, some fry will survive. Once they start breeding, they continue daily for several weeks.

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